Monthly Archives: May 2015

10 Forest School Activities I’ve done recently that have gone down well!

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Over the past year or so I have been working regularly in primary schools, mainly with Reception to Year 3. Listed are 10 Lesson Plans for activities that have proved popular.

As always, they are offered on the basis that you carry out your own risk assessments and SNLA is in no way responsible for how material provided by this website might be used by third parties.

1. Story Landscapes – Troll Mazes 

Reception & Year 1

Aim. To encourage narrative construction and storytelling.

In Brief. Children are told a story about nasty trolls. Children use sticks, wool, tiny pebbles and clay to make trolls. Children work together to make a maze to stop the trolls from escaping.

Main ELGs

Understanding. Children follow the sequence of instructions in respect of the activities and seek support in a way that is relevant to the activity.

Speaking. They develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.

Being imaginative: Children use materials in original ways, thinking about uses and purposes. They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through role play and stories.

Preparation. Make a small, three-circuit labyrinth out of pebbles to demonstrate the technique. Children can make a pebble maze to their own design

Activities

a) Children are told a short story about trolls and their habits. Explain how Norse sailors made mazes out of pebbles on the beaches so that the trolls couldn’t follow them onto the boats and make mischief at sea.
b) Each child makes a troll, using clay, small sticks, tiny pebbles and sheeps wool for hair (trolls have very long hair)
c) Make a maze for your troll family out of pebbles that is so confusing they will not be able to escape.
d) Tell the Story. Children take it in turns to contribute to the narrative.
Reflection. What did you like best about making up your story?

Hazards. Ensure all children are adequately clothed for the wet conditions. Remind children about the usual hedgerow hazards of fungi, brambles and nettles. Remind about not putting hands in mouth or eyes after handling clay, raw wool or found materials.

Tools & Materials: Buckets containing pebbles of different sizes. Clay, very thin willow (thin enough to cut with scissors) but pre-cut a bucket of small pieces. Make an exemplar troll figure and pebble maze.

 

2. Stick Towers

Years 3 to 6

Aims. To develop structure building techniques. To develop skills in the use of guy ropes.

NC Themes: Structures, Materials & Forces. Identifying how the wind and weight pressures are transferred to the ground via poles and guy ropes. Opposing forces providing strength.

Activity.

Divide the group into teams of 3 to 4. The challenge is to build a tower with sticks taller than anyone else’s.

Ex. 1. Team-building/ problem solving activity – Tower-building Challenge using sticks, masking tape, twine, and steel tent pegs.

Discuss how we put up structures that are taller than ourselves.
Discuss the TV mast on the Mendips. What stops it falling down?
Share how tall structures may be pre-assembled on the ground before being raised up and supported by guy ropes.
Demonstrate how to make a strong tripod base supported by guy ropes. Demonstrate how to secure guy ropes firmly to steel tent pegs.
Explain and demonstrate safe handling of materials and tools – mallets, twine, tent pegs, pre-cut sticks. Explain hazards and avoiding injury.
Working in teams of 3/4, children construct tall towers, supported by guy ropes.
Ex 2. Take down structures, pack up and leave the field and the materials as you found them.

Reflection. Show and tell – we worked well as a team because…..

Materials: 4 Bundles of 15 one metre long willow sticks , 6 rubber mallets, 40 tent pegs, ball of parcel twine, scissors), 4 rolls of masking tape.

Hazards. Demonstrate safe use of rubber mallets. Advise on tapping action and not swinging mallet above the head. Warn about not running with tools, including steel tent pegs. Warn about safely carrying sticks and poles to avoid injury to face and eyes and demonstrate correct method. Check structures as they are built to avoid collapse that may result in injury.

3. Icarus Challenge – Make a wing that flies like a Kite.

Years 3 to 6 – but popular with older kids

Aim. To allow children to experiment with a range of materials to make a strong structure.3. Kite wing

In Brief. Children make a wing or kite structure to their own design and decorate it. The wing is tested by being pulled /flown across the field. 3. Kite wing

KS1/2 Design & Technology.
Use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing. Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria. Build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable. n.b. The most straightforward way to make a kite frame is to tape two pieces of willow of 1 metre length together at both ends and then stretch them apart with a third piece of willow (like inserting an arrow between two bows) that is around 40cm in length. This is then strengthened with a cross-member that runs from top to bottom of the kite. Newpapers must be taped at all joins for strength.

 Activities.

Warm Up. Flying Carpet race (3 teams). Children stood together on a tarp or blanket (3 per tarp or blanket) cross the field without stepping off. Various methods can be tried, with everyone hopping forward on the count of 3 and the tarp being pulled by those at the front being on of the more successful.
Icarus’s Wings making activity (4 groups divided into two areas).
Tell the story of Icarus.
Discuss how we might make a pair of wings. To meet the challenge the kite should be about 1 metre tall and 40cms deep. They should look like wings (bird/plane/kite). They should have a covering, such as newspaper, to provide the lift surface (aerofoil). Provide an exemplar.
Challenge to make one set of kite-like wings per group of 3.
Challenge – it must stay in one piece when pulled across the field on a string. It must be big enough. It should take off.
You win if it looks fantastic even if it doesn’t fly.
Materials: Willow sticks of various lengths. String. Masking Tape. Newspapers, strips of fabric to act as a tail.

Decorate the wing. Use grasses, leaves and any other materials of their choice to decorate the wing,

Wing Flying Challenge.
Hold the wing flying challenge with the runners at a safe distance from each other.

Reflection. How well did your teams work today?

Hazards. Fully supervise any cutting activities involving scissors and mini-hacksaw. Ensure children pulling the kites are at least 10 metres apart to present injuries to legs etc.. Warn of the hazards of kite flying and ensure the wind is mild and children are pulling into the wind. Observe kite action and stop activity if flight patterns become unpredictable.

4. Clay Owls

Year 1 to 3 – but popular with older kids

Aim. To develop fine motor skills in manipulating clay through a series of pre-defined stages, 8. Clay Owlswith children working together and supporting each other. To encourage children to listen carefully and follow a precise set of instructions.

KS1 – Design & Technology.
Children gain insight into a basic production process where are series of pre-defined stages are followed to complete a product.

KS1 – Art

Children engage in making a decorative item and engage creatively with the making process.

Activity.

1. Children make a neat ball of clay
2. Children use a rolling pin to flatten the ball into a disk
3. The clay is decorated with a feather pattern, using a pen top.
4. The clay is folded carefully in the required sequence.
5. The detailing is completed, including adding ‘Mum’ to the design.
6. If complete, children can make a second owl – this can be a daddy and a baby owl to make a family group.

Reflection. What is Mothering Sunday for? Why are mums special?

Tools & Materials: Clay, 7 rolling pins, 10 pens with tops, trays to store finished product. Safe plastic knives to finish the fine detailing.

 

 

5. Stick Mobiles

Year 2 to 6

Aims. To improve their skills in applying their knowledge of basic measurement and 2D shapes.18. Stick Mobiles1
To enable children to enjoy their creativity.

In Brief. Children collect natural materials to make a mobile. Using a small number of demonstrated techniques children assemble a stick mobile. Children will be asked to ‘theme’ their mobile and explain the connections between the items used (shape, colour, season, trees etc..)

KS1 – Recognizing and handling 2D shapes.

Design & Technology – use a range of tools and materials to cut their wood to the desired size, and assemble and join their selected components to achieve the product as described.

Activities.

a) Children explore two exemplars. What are mobiles for? How are they put together? Talk about the mobiles in terms of materials used and possible themes (seasons, colours, shapes). Demonstrate how the sticks can be attached to the twine by untwisting a section of twine and inserting the stick into the resultant loop and then re-twisting closed.
b) Children are given plenty of time to collect a bag of ‘treasure’ to make their mobiles.
c) Children are given demonstrations on how to assemble their mobiles.
d) Children assemble the main form of their mobile with string or green sisal – and decorate sticks with colour pens, wools and tapes.
e) additional items, such as feathers, leaves or small, decorative sticks are threaded through the string.
f) Children explain their mobiles to the rest of the group
Reflection . Are you happy with how you cooperated and worked together? Say that you liked about the activity and the product you made.

Hazards. Warn about not running whilst carrying sticks. Remind them to look carefully before picking up ‘found’ objects to make sure there are no hazards. Remind them not to put fingers near mouth or eyes once they have started to collect. Supervise at one adult to 3 mini-hacksaws in use. Issue only as many tools as can be supervised Ensure that the hand holding the stick is gloved when sawing with mini-hacksaw. Give very clear instructions about working away from the body and not towards it.

Materials. Simplified rules to pin to shed. 5 mini-hacksaws and spare blades. Reels of coloured tape. 3 pairs of scissors. 5 grooved blocks. Spools of wool to make hanging loops. Spare ‘found’ sticks. Bale of string. Brace and bit in case children wish to drill holes through thicker sticks. ‘Washing line’ for hanging exemplar mobiles and ‘made’ mobiles.

6. Clay Monsters

Years 1 to 3

Aim. To encourage story-telling based on experiences. To utilize natural materials to suggest form and shape.

In Brief. Children talk about dragons and other monsters as well as creepy-crawlies and other unpleasant creatures. Children make monsters out of clay and found items.

KS1 Spoken Language. Children give well-structured explanations and narratives for different purposes. Use spoken language to express their imagination.

Art & Design. Children develop their ability to use colour, pattern, texture, line, shape, form and space.

Activities.

How many monster and creepy-crawly creatures can we name? Can we describe them?
Explain the purpose of the treasure hunt. Explain that we will be making monsters and creepy-crawlies out of clay and small sticks, bits of moss, wool, shells, small pebbles and any other odd thing we can find to add to the existing collection.
Treasure Hunt. Scour the available spaces (woodland, park or school field) for useful items. Aim to bring back at least five very different items. On return, add your finds to the communal bowls. If there is something very special yo wish to keep you may hang on to a maximum of two items.
Demonstrate making technique – working the clay to make it more malleable, using sticks for limbs, demonstrate using a twig to push wool into the clay to create hair.
Children make one or two monsters, depending on available time. Encourage careful and detailed work and praise outcomes.
Share outcomes. Make up a story about your monster. Where does it live? What does it eat? What is it doing in the wood?
Reflection. What is imagination? How does it help us?

Hazards. Remind children about hedgerow hazards of fungi, brambles and nettles. Remind about not putting hands in mouth.

Materials. Provide a couple of exemplar monsters made out of clay and found materials to demonstrate making techniques. Bowl of exemplar ‘finds’ – odd sticks, bits of moss, small pebbles, raw wool, feathers etc.. Bag of air-drying clay.

7. Easter Garden

Years 1 to 3

Aim. To celebrate Easter with a traditional Easter Activity. 9. Easter Garden

In Brief. Children make an Easter Garden in the side of the mound facing the labyrinth. Children make mini- Easter Gardens to take home.

KS1 – Design & Technology.
Children gain insight into a basic production process where are series of pre-defined stages are followed to complete a product.

KS1 – Art

Children engage in making a decorative item and engage creatively with the making process.

Activities.

The group is split into 2. One group makes the mini – Easter Gardens whilst the second group makes the big Easter Garden. They swap over after the Easter Chocolate break.

Activity Stages for full-size Easter Garden.

1. Children gather the materials to make 3 crosses, stones for the tomb etc.. and flowers.
2. The tomb is made first, including a stone to cover the entrance.
3. Willow is cut with mini-hacksaws and then tied to make 3 crosses.
4. The flowers are planted around the tomb.
5. The crosses are positioned in the ground.

Activity Stages for min-Easter Garden

1. Children gather moss, tiny flowers, very small stones for their Easter Garden.
2. They use mini-hacksaws or are supported with secateurs (adult use) to cut two pieces of willow to make a single cross (3 crosses if they are fast and able!). These are tied to make a small cross.
3. A golf ball size piece of clay is flattened on one side to make a small mound.
4. The tomb is carefully made with tiny stones pushed into the clay.
5. Using a thin twig , mosses and tiny flowers are inserted into the mound.
6. The cross is places at the highest point on the clay mound.

Reflection. What is the story behind the Easter Garden?

Hazards. Children supervised at 1:4 for hacksaw use. Warn children to take care when gathering materials.

Tools & Materials. Fine willow. Mini-hacksaws and secateurs to cut. Clay, red or green wool on bobbins to tie the crosses. Scissors. Possibly cup cake holders to make them in or similar. Trays to store finished products. Trowels, box of primroses or similar for full-size Easter Garden.

8. Making a Mini – Worm Farm

Year 2 to 6

Aim. To find out about the functions of earthworms relative to the ecology of soil. To find out about the diet and behaviour of earthworms.

In Brief. Children go on a worm hunt in specific environments and make observations about their findings. Children begin work on a worm farm.

KS1 Science. Children identify that worms live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how the habitats provide for the basic needs. Children can describe how worms obtain their food using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food.
Main Activities.

Warm Up. Birds and Worms Game – can the birds pull the worm out of the whole (birds versus worms tug-of-war)
Stages for Worm Hunt.
Children are given a selected area within the Forest School Area to search for worms.
They are instructed to work with care in their worm hunt, turning over stones, logs, vegetation and careful digging, safeguarding worms. Found worms are stored in the containers provided.
Worms from each area are counted and checked for size.
Sharing information and conclusions based on finds.
Parts of the worm – describe what they see.

Make a Worm Farm. Working in teams of two or three Children cut the top off a large plastic bottle with scissors and tape the edge . Pour in 2 inches gravel or stones for drainage. Alternate 5cm layers of sand and earth. Lightly spray with water to provide moisture Put a few small pieces of semi-decomposed vegetable waste in the middle for worm food. Continue with soil layers till bottle is full. Add worms. Tape the top back on or cover top with plastic wrap and tape. Put drain holes into base. Take worm farms to the classroom to observe. Store in a dark place.

Reflection. How important are worms to us? What would happen if there were no worms?

Hazards. Ensure children dig far enough away from each other not to cause accidental injury with any digging process. Warn about not moving any stone or log stump that are too heavy to move safely. Warn about placing soil in the bucket and not flicking or throwing such as to risk injury to eyes.

Tools & Materials. Peg out worm find areas for 4 small groups – string, pegs, rubber mallets. Two buckets per group and trowel per child. 1 large plastic coke bottle per group, insulating tape. Bag of fine gravel. Bag of sand (B & Q). Small quantity rotten vegetable food waste or other garden waste.

9. Making a Bird’s Nest and Eggs out of Clay

Reception to Year 2

Aims. Children learn about aspects of the life of birds – the dangers they face and how that affects where they build their nests. Children make a nest and eggs.

Main ELGs

Children work cooperatively and with consideration in the making activities. They are prepared to take turns and play with consideration.

Children move confidently and are able to make simple nest and clay eggs. They negotiate the spaces safely.

Children are able to identify aspects of the environment that might be important to birds and their safety. They are able to identify the environmental factors that will influence bird behaviour in selecting a nest site.

Starter . Hawks and Birds Game. Create a small number of ‘safe’ places or nests on the school field. These are marked with tyres. Children pretend to be baby birds. They ‘fly’ freely on the lower half of the field looking for food until the ‘hawks’ appear (2 children flying a red piece of fabric). When the hawks appear the children must return to the nest and be very still. If they are tagged by a hawk they are ‘dead’ until the round is over.

Activities .

Gathering Material to make a Nest. What do birds make their nests out of? What can a bird carry? Talk about the different materials used by small birds to build their nests.
Children are given a collecting back and collect long dry grasses, very thin twigs, moss for making a nest.

Make a Nest. Working in pairs, children make a simple nest.
Find a Safe Place for the Nest. Where would birds build their nests? They must be out of sight from humans, cats and hawks. Children now find a suitable place to put their nests. When this is done they share their nest location with other groups.
Make small speckled eggs for the Nest. Working in two colours of air-drying clay, make speckled eggs and position them in the nest. Do the nests hold the eggs safely.
Treasure Hunt. Find the chocolate eggs in the Forest School area.

Reflection . Did I work well with my friends? Did we help each other? What will happen if a bird does not hide its nest carefully. Crows and Rooks don’t hide their nests. How do they keep them safe.

Materials. Provide extra grass and moss in case of shortage on the ground. Provide terracotta and stone coloured clay for egg-making. 4 red streamers for the hawks. Green twine or garden twists and safety scissors to help children in tying the nests to shape. Chocolate Eggs!!

10. Making Free-standing Shelters

Years 3 to 6

Aims. To provide an opportunity to utilize learnt skills in a creative task. To develop structure 20. Shelter Framebuilding and knot-tying skills. To discuss the role of shelters in moderating the environment to facilitate human activity.

In Brief.  Working in teams, children build shelters hazel poles, guy ropes, tarpaulins, with an emphasis on using the skills acquiring during the course to date.

Science – Structures & Materials – Identifying the suitability of materials to carry out particular functions.
Forces – understanding how structures work – Identifying how the wind and weight pressures are transferred to the ground via poles and guy ropes. Opposing forces providing strength.

A demonstration shelter is set up in advance. Children can examine, evaluate and copy or make a design of their own. It will be stressed that the activity is time limited. The demonstration shelter frame consists of a 3 metre hazel pole supported by two ‘A’ frames made with 1.2 metre poles. The structure is braced by two guy ropes at either end. The tarpaulin is placed over the hazel pole and pegged down with steel tent pegs (picture to follow).

Activity. To make a free-standing shelter per group of 4 that is wind and rain proof…

a) Divide into four groups and provide identical materials to each group (see below).
b) Discuss the functions of temporary shelters and their characteristics if they are to work properly – ability to shed rain, withstand wind forces, provide sufficient covered space. Discuss peoples and parts of the world where portable shelters are still used as primary living space.
c) Set the challenge – to build a free-standing rain and windproof shelter capable of sheltering the group building it.
d) Groups visit each others’ shelters and peer evaluate each others’ work.
Reflection. Have they worked successfully as teams with everyone having a function and the group having a mechanism for making decisions? Were the shelters successful? If there were aspects of the work that could have been done better, what were they?

Hazards. Ensure that children are briefed on safety first in carrying poles. Provide guidance on the use of mallets and steel tent pegs. Ensure that all steel pegs are collected in at the end of the activity.

Materials. (for 4 groups) 4 x 3 metre poles, 8 x 1.2 metre poles, 4 rubber mallets and 40 steel tent pegs, 2 balls of twine, 4 pairs safety scissors.

Enterprise & Rural Craft Skills Course 2015 – the Programme

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We are always happy to share our work with other professionals and this post provides you with the full programme for 2015. The course ha been made possible by grants from the ‘Awards for All’ Lottery Fund and a grant from the Ernest Cook Trust. Our sincere thanks goes to both awarding bodies.

During the Spring and Summer Terms we added two new units to our successful course – ‘Media & Enterprise’ , and ‘Horticulture & Animal Husbandry’.

151. Media1 DevOwDean

Working on a Recycling Commercial

Media Filming 
The Media & Enterprise unit one out in a course that is otherwise devoted to rural industries. Its introduction reflects the need for all types of businesses, large and small, to be able to promote their products and services successfully and make best use of what is available. The nine hour course was led by Tim Knock, a professional film-maker who has worked with many local companies. Students were free to choose their theme.

163. Padd2 Beccas Lambs

Welcoming Newborn Lambs

172. Padd2 JackBenJake Fence

Fence Erection by two 13-year-olds at Paddington Farm, Glastonbury

The Animal Husbandry and Horticulture Unit took place at Paddington Farm, near Glastonbury, where students enjoyed some real, hands-on experience. I had no idea how the students would take to this unit and was frankly astonished at the hard work and sheer professionalism of their work, particularly since the students, with one exception, did not enjoy farming backgrounds. The first cohort (there are two schools participating) enjoyed sun the first week and rain the next – and worked with equal enthusiasm regardless of the weather!

Funding for our BTEC Pilot in Business and Enterprise has been provided by the Ernest Cook Trust.

 

 

  1. Health and Safety Induction & Pop-Up Business Challenge
4. Crispin

Working on the Business Idea presentation

Aims. To introduce students to the RBB and induct them into safe working practices. To introduce students to the range of businesses operating from the Red Brick Building. To introduce students to enterprise start-up and the importance of teamwork.

Outcomes. Students can identify trusted adults on site, the location of facilities essential to their welfare, and safe practices for working in the Red Brick Building. Students have insight into the risks and opportunities of self-employment. Students understand the central role of small businesses to the UK economy. Students make a photographic record of their activities.

Experiences.

Part 1. Health and safety induction. A tour of the building. Introduction to 3 people running small businesses at the Red Brick.

Students sign Health & Safety Induction Form.

Students are introduced to record keeping and the two cameras available to photograph their work and the strategy of making are photographic record throughout.

Part 2. Pop-up Business Challenge. Working in twos or threes, students share their knowledge of businesses on the Glastonbury and Street high streets and think of a product or service that might complement the existing mix and share their ideas.

Students give a presentation of their ideas in their groups.

In 2 groups discussion of possible business ideas“Our business idea is to …..

Who is your market? Who will it appeal to most? How do you reach them with affordable advertising (where do you put the ads)?

Think of a brand name and design the brand logo.

Think of a strapline to go with your logo.

Explain where and how you will market your product or service.

Photograph student participation in presentation.

Part 3. Team Challenge. Students work in teams to meet a challenge – building a self-supporting tower out of newspapers, tape and string from floor to ceiling. Outcomes are self-evaluated. Photograph process and outcomes for record of achievement.

Part 4. Circle Discussion of team skills demonstrated during the session. What can we do to build skills?

Part 5. Complete self-evaluation form.

  

2. Craft Skills – Steampunk Accessories

46. 2Steampunk Rebeccas 2

Making Steampunk Products

Aims. To introduce students to craft skills by making a saleable item out of recycled materials, to include materials relating to the traditional local area craft economies.

Outcomes. Students design and make one or two products – jewellery such as collar, wristband brooch out of recycled materials. Some aspect of the materials will relate to the traditional Glastonbury economies of leather, wool or ceramics. Students can choose to make a range of easy-to-make products over the two weeks or one complex product. Students make a photographic record of their activities.

Experiences.

 Part 1. Students are asked to reflect on when they work as teams – what sports, classroom activities, any other contexts in their lives. A list is made on the flipchart.

Part 2. Exploring the Product. Students use laptops or tablets to explore available products and materials available online to make products.

Reflect on prices – the expensive nature of authentic items – such as items made of genuine old watch parts – and mass produced products. What do we not try to compete with? Who is the market for this product range? (n.b. Cheap online items typically cost £2.50. Bespoke pieces made out of genuine recycled materials (see ‘entropy watch’ or ‘watch cufflinks’ can be in the low hundreds.)

Part 3. Research. Students are introduced to Steampunk materials – include lace offcuts, leather, broken watch and clock components and small items of wearable machinery.

Part 4. Design. Select a product type and produce a design on cartridge paper, using pencil and colours. Reserve work and notes for record of achievement. Students have materials to research to help with this.

Part 5. Make. Make the product with support from craftspeople. Photograph processes.

Part 6. Evaluate. Discuss pricing and profits. How much do the materials cost per item? How long did it take to make? What is the best it could sell for retail? What would they sell at wholesale (think 50% retail maximum). How do you reach customers if they are to be sold retail? What are they working for per hour? How can they increase the profitability?

Part 6. Circle Discussion of skills demonstrated during the session. What can we do to build skills?

Part 7. Complete self-evaluation form.

 

3. Craft Skills – Steampunk Accessories (2)

60. Steampunk finish david leo

The Lads compare Steampunk Wristbands


Aims.
To consider how products might be designed or made in partnership. To explore the value of sharing ideas and dividing labour.

Outcomes. Students design and make one or two products – jewellery such as collar, wristband brooch out of recycled materials. Some aspect of the materials will relate to the traditional Glastonbury economies of leather, wool or ceramics. Students can choose to make a range of easy-to-make products over the two weeks or one complex product. Students make a photographic record of their activities.

Experiences.

Part 1. Evaluate working processes. Group discussion of working processes from the previous week. What factors shaped their choice of product? What new skills did they need to learn? What problems did they have to solve? What do they like about their outcomes? What could they d better?

Part 2. Discuss. Working in groups. Why can a 20 people working in a factory produce far more than 20 people making the complete product on their own? In the first chapter of  ”The Wealth of Nations”, Adam Smith, explains the optimum organization of a pin factory. Traditional pin makers could produce only a few dozen pins a day. However, when organized in a factory with each worker performing a limited operation, they could produce tens of thousands a day.

Part 3. Design a product and process in a pair or a team of three. Choose a different product from last week. Unlike last week the decisions made must be shared. Part of the discussion includes how the work involved in making the product can be shared. Do they have different skills or interests that can address different aspects of the task.

Part 4. Make. Make the product, dividing the tasks between the team. The team can make two similar or different items, dividing labour (say cutting and sewing). Photograph processes.

Part 5. Evaluate. Compare the work processes this week compared with last week. What difference did it make to share tasks and decision-making – easier or harder?

Part 6. Circle Discussion of skills demonstrated during the session. What are their feelings about working as a pair. What can we do to improve team skills?

Part 7. Complete self-evaluation form.

 4Media and Business (1) 

121. Clay LeoOsmanDavid4

The group present their Business Model

Aims. To enable students to understand and articulate the role of the media products in promoting every kind of business. To enable students to identify the function of media products in their environment. To design a media product they would like to make.

Outcomes. Students can articulate the range of media products they have identified, their audiences and purposes. Students can articulate the relationship between media products and income generation. Students make a photographic record of their activities.

Experiences.

151. Media1 DevOwDean

On location prep for making the commercial

Presentation by tutors. What is a media product? What kind of media products are made in the Red Brick Building? (The Basis, films, posters, audio products (GFM)). Students study example of advertising and promotional media products generally. Tutors briefly explain how they make their living.

The Purpose of Media Products. Online study of commercials. What is the function of the examples? What are they selling? Tour can explore how the media studio works and the kinds of equipment used. Briefly look at a couple of pre-selected online media products. How do they raise revenue? Who do they appeal to?

  1. Presentation by tutors. What is a media product? What kind of media products are made in the Red Brick Building? (The Basis, films, posters, audio products (GFM)). Students study example of advertising and promotional media products generally. Tutors briefly explain how they make their living.
  1. The Purpose of Media Products. Tour of the building and online study to explore exemplars. What is the function of the examples? What are they selling? Tour can explore how the media studio works and the kinds of equipment used. Briefly look at a couple of pre-selected online media products. How do they raise revenue? Who do they appeal to?
  1. Choose a product and a medium. Students divide themselves into 3 teams. They identify product they would like to design or make. This can be an audio product, magazine item including an advert or adverts, photo-based moving image, or online product including a Youtube product, or short radio interview or commercial.
  1. Design the product and collate a portfolio of brief notes and sketches where relevant in response to a multiple choice format. Questions to answer are:
  2. a) What will your media product do (entertain, sell, provide news, advertise an event)?
  3. b) Who is it for? Who is the audience (small children, teenagers, adults, fashion-conscious, parents, local shoppers, gamesters etc..).
  4. c) What is the medium (magazine advert, poster, radio advertising, youtube, TV commercial, short film)?
  5. d) What does it look like (what will the article be about, what will be in the photographs, what is the narrative, what precisely are you selling?)
  6. e) Work up your ideas into a sales ‘pitch’.
  1. Informal presentations. Students share their ideas with the others. Tutors discuss the practicalities of putting together the products and help refine the outcomes into something that is sufficiently challenging but achievable within the timeframe and the means available.

Part 6. Complete self-evaluation form.

                    

5. Media and Business (2)

178. Media2 ClaireChloe

Cafe commercial being filmed on location

Aims. To appreciate the importance of promotion in selling a product or service. To explore the most common forms of promotion relative to the business interests of the students. To make a media product.

Outcomes. Students can identify the forms of promotion available and have a basic understanding of their relative advantages, costs and ‘reach’. Students continue working on a media product for their business. Students make a photographic record of their activities.

Experiences.

  1.   Students review progress on their media product with the tutors. They complete all design work (e.g. storyboards, outline ideas for an advert in a magazine. Tutors check that student choices are both challenging and achievable.

2.    Tutors demonstrate techniques for using the equipment (e.g. use of camera, computer based editing)

3.   Students work in their groups on the product. Wherever possible this is achieved through a distribution of tasks in keeping with the student’s interests and abilities (acting/ camera/editing. Tutors provide all necessary coaching and technical support.

4. Progress is evaluated at the end of the session and a list of priorities to complete the product is noted.

5. Complete self-evaluation form.

6. Media and Business (3)

192a. Media3 Dean Visit

Finding out about Local Radio advertising


Aims. To enable students to complete their media products to a satisfactory standard. To put
together an event in which the outcomes of student work are presented and evaluated. To review outcomes in terms of meeting the objectives for which they were made.

 Outcomes. Students finish their media products or reach a point where there is enough material produced to evaluate outcomes. Students organize an event where they present their work to other students. The products may be incorporated in the Basis magazine of broadcast on GFM. Students make a photographic record of their activities.

Experiences.

  1. Students are supported by tutors in completing their media products and portfolios (pictures, diagrams, notes, scrap book etc..). Where work cannot be completed on time students will present their outcomes so far.
  1. Students prepare the presentation of their work and determine how it will be presented and in what order. All groups will contribute to planning the presentation as if it was an event in front of an audience
  1. Students present / perform their work to each other with a commentary.
  1. Discussion in which students peer evaluate their outcomes.
  1. Students receive certificate awards on the basis of their work.
  1. Complete self-evaluation form.

 

 7. Starting a Small Business (1)

91. Clay Claire

Making a clay owl using a mass-production technique


Aim.
To define a small business. To reflect on the nature of small businesses that service a rural and semi-rural environment. To identify a business idea that might interest them. To explore the challenges involved in setting up a small business.

Outcomes. Students understand the importance of small businesses to the British economy. Students can identify a range of small businesses in their own area. Students identify a business idea (retail or service provider) they would like to pursue and assemble the elements of a business plan, utilizing a simple matrix.

Experiences.

  1. Discussion – What is a small business. Students identify small businesses that they have interacted with. What is the nature of the business? (retail, service industry (entertainment, restaurant, gardener, waste disposal, hairdressing, beauty), service provider (online services). 1a. Warm-up Manufacturing Activity. Students make a clay owl and review item in terms of material costs, time taken to manufacture, retail price of finished item and possible profit margin.
  1. Local small business person. Presentation of how they started their business and what drew them into that area.
  1. What does it take to start a small business? Students are split into two groups each producing a chart of their collective thoughts. Groups each give a short presentation. Topic areas might include ‘What do I want to do?’, ‘What would I love to sell?’, ‘how do I find my market?’, ‘how can I be different from the competition?’, ‘do I need training?’, ‘do I need experience?’, ‘how much will it cost?’, ‘what are the set-up costs?’
  1. Come up with a business idea that would interest them. Identifying the personal interests that click with a business idea. What business idea fits in with who they are?
  1. Pop-up Business Idea. Explain what a pop-up business is. Students complete a matrix for a pop-up business idea and then do a ‘Dragon’s Den’ type presentation to identify the idea most likely to make money.
  1. Students review their experiences and what they have learned.
  1. Complete self-evaluation form.

 

8. Starting a Small Business (2)

133. Bridge OsLeDa

Working on the bridge-building team challenge


Aim.
To gain insight into the challenges and opportunities associated with running a small business in a rural environment. To complete a team challenge. To put together a business plan for products of this kind.

Outcomes. Students gain insight into the costs involved in running a small business, how to estimate profitability and the problem of raising capital.

Experiences 

  1. Bridge-Building Challenge. Making a suspension bridge out of newspaper.
  1. Explore a Rural Craft product range – Willow and market for willow by exploring Somerset willow products websites.
  1. Discuss why ‘natural’ and ‘sustainable’ products are popular. What is a ‘sustainable’ and ‘environmentally friendly’ product? Why do people like the ‘traditional’ look?
  1. Costing a Business. Students continue work on their business model from the previous week. Each team works with a tutor to bring their Business Plan to completion.
  1. Presentations. Each group presents their business costings and explain why they think their business could service a capital loan.
  1. Students review their experiences and what they have learned.
  1. Complete self-evaluation form.

 

 

9. Horticulture & Animal Husbandry (1 of 2)

158. Paddington Planting All

Planting runner beans at Paddington Fam

 Aim. To explore the range of activities carried out at Paddington Farm. To understand the role of Paddington Farm and how different people on site generate income. To experience an activity in horticulture and animal husbandry.

Outcomes. Students can describe the range of activities on the farm. Students become familiar with the farm and its safety requirements. Students experience a horticultural and animal husbandry activity. Students make a photographic record of their activities.

Experiences.

  1. A tour of the farm to include:
  2. a) Health & Safety in a Farm Environment, including hygiene and safety with tools and animals.
  3. b) The market garden beds – what is grown, by whom and how it is brought to market.
  4. c) The livestock – the sheep – a brief introduction to the land requirements, the costs involved in rearing and keeping them healthy and bringing lambs to market.
  5. d) The accommodation and introduction to the function of the farm as an educational resource for students from London.
  6. e) The Scrap Scheme and how it raises funds.

(if the group number – typically 6 -9 – is too big for the activity, the group can be split and a swap over take place at the end of the agreed time.)

  1. Carrying out a horticultural activity: Students work for approximately 30 – 40 minutes on horticultural task in which they will acquire the basic skills to carry out one or two tasks safely and in an economically productive way.
  1. Carrying out a livestock activity: Sheep/lamb related activities and horse grooming, to include feeding and mucking out.
  1. Students review their experiences and what they have learned. Students decide how they would like to use their time in the following week – to include horticulture, animal husbandry and general maintenance.
  1. Complete self-evaluation form.

 

10. Horticulture & Animal Husbandry (2 of 2)

163. Padd2 Beccas Lambs

Bringing newborn lambs to shelter from the rain


Aim.
To experience a typical working morning on a farm. To engage in the range of tasks associated with caring for an animal. To engage in the maintenance tasks associated with a market garden or another area of farm maintenance. To find out more about how the farm products are brought to market. To identify the special interests that make working on a farm a career choice.

Outcomes. Students complete a range of tasks typical of working on a farm. Students can articulate the processes associated with deriving an income from a farm or market garden. Students understand that it is in the nature of animal husbandry and horticulture that it is labour intensive and requires commitment. Students make a photographic record of their activities.

Experiences.

  1. Review their experiences of the previous week: what did they find most interesting or enjoyable? What did they learn? The activities for the second week are explained. Students are given the opportunity to tailor their programme of activities if possible.
  1. Students review the skills and attitudes that are useful in a farm environment.
  1. Carrying out an extended horticultural activity: Students work for approximately 30 – 40 minutes on horticultural task in which they will acquire the basic skills to carry out one or two tasks safely and in an economically productive way.
  1. Carrying out an extended livestock activity: Sheep/lamb related activities and horse grooming, to include feeding and mucking out.
  1. Carrying out a maintenance task.
  1. Students review their experiences and what they have learned. Students describe the tasks they have carried out and the personal commitment the tasks have needed. They describe their own thoughts and feelings about working in a farm environment.
  1. Complete self-evaluation form.

 

11. Introduction to making Green Furniture (1 of 3)

207. Hallr1 Intro All

Martin shows of his mallet

Aims. To introduce students to the Hallr Wood environment, safe working practices within the wood and domestic arrangements. To identify the types of timber that are useful in making furniture and their properties. To understand why there is a market for hand-crafted furniture of this kind. To appreciate the environmental issues that are addressed by using traditional manufacturing techniques. To learn to safely used a saw horse and saw and splitting tools.

Outcomes. Students are confident in working in the woodland space. Students work safely at all times. Students contribute to the domestic arrangements by taking responsibility for maintaining the fire etc…. Students understand the processes involved in making a joint stool. Students select suitable piece of timber for their stool legs and cut four legs each using a sawhorse, bow saw and splitting tools.

Experiences.

  1. A tour of Hallr Wood and its main features and facilities.
  1. Explanation of Health and Safety requirements, domestic and hygiene arrangements. Fetching water.
  1. Fire-lighting demonstration, fire rules and safe practices.
  1. Discussion – why traditional furniture making, including a demonstration of traditional tools. Personal and environmental benefits.
  1. Identifying types of wood suitable for making furniture and their properties, including identifying examples themselves. How to identify when wood is seasoned.
  1. Introduction to saw horse and bow saw, locating suitable timber from the stock available. Sawing a suitable piece of timber each.
  1. Demonstration of safe use of splitting tools (wedge and mallet). Students use splitting tools to cut their block of wood into four matched pieces.
  1. Students tidy up their working environment.
  1. Students review their experiences and what they have learned. Students review the tasks they have carried out. They describe their own thoughts and feelings about working in a woodland environment.
  1. Complete self-evaluation form.

 

12. Introduction to making green furniture (2 of 3)

217. Hallr1 OwenDean Saw2

Sawing timber to make stool legs


Aims.
To understand safe and efficient working practices associated with using a shave horse and draw knife. To understand the importance of regular measurement and attention to detail to avoid waste. To understand the importance of following the recommended techniques for draw knife use. To experience an extended period of craft activity and reflect on the experience.

Outcomes. Students work safely and conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to the working environment at all times. Students are attentive to their contribution to the domestic arrangements and the wellbeing of others. Students complete one or two legs to a high standard and are satisfied with the accuracy and tightness of the joint.

Experiences.

  1. Students light a fire, fetch water and complete early domestic arrangements.
  1. Students are trained in the use of a shave horse and draw knife and practice the techniques.
  1. Students use a pencil and template to mark out their piece of wood.
  1. Students use the shave horse, drawknife and other trimming tools to achieve a well-shaped leg that is a tight fit in the template.
  1. Students tidy up their working environment.
  1. Discussion. Woodland resources. How do woods pay for themselves? What qualifications and experience is needed to work professionally in a woodland environment.
  1. Students review their experiences and what they have learned. Students review the tasks they have carried out. They describe their own thoughts and feelings about work requiring this type of physical and mental commitment.
  1. Complete self-evaluation form.

 

13. Introduction to making green furniture (3 of 3)

233. Hallr2 Shavehorse Claire Chloe

Mastering the shave horse

 Aims. To develop and improve skills with the tools in use. To develop skills in identifying and prioritizing tasks in order to achieve the objective. To develop resilience in dealing with any problems, if necessary by redoing tasks. To develop technique in using a brace and bit. To celebrate outcomes.

Outcomes. Students use a brace and bit safely and accurately to bore the sockets for their stool legs in the seat (at least one and ideally all). Students complete the legs by shaping and smoothing them with a drawknife. They finish their stools. Students identify where errors have been made and how to remedy them. Students support the making of pizzas for a celebration snack.

Experiences.

  1. Students light a fire fetch water and complete early domestic arrangements including preparing the pizza oven.
  1. Students are trained in the use of a brace and bit. They practice on scrap wood before boring one to three sockets, depending on available time.
  1. Students use the shavehorse to complete their stool legs and use any available time to smooth and shape the legs to a good standard.
  1. Students assemble the stools, check the legs are firm and are supported in remedying significant errors.
  1. Students tidy up their working environment.
  1. Students help with the preparation of the pizzas (time permitting).
  1. Students review their experiences and what they have learned. Students review the tasks they have carried out. They describe their own thoughts and feelings about work requiring this type of physical and mental commitment.
  1. Complete self-evaluation form.